24. Sins Gone

Short Meditations for Easter on the Cross: 24. Sins Gone

1 Pet 2:24  “He himself bore our sins” in his body on the cross, so that we might die to sins and live for righteousness; “by his wounds you have been healed.”

I am sure we so often read verses of Scripture and just don’t pause to think exactly what it is that we are reading. This verse above is absolutely amazing in what it says. The first phrase, as with what follows, is clearly a quote from Isa 53. But note carefully.

First, “he himself bore our sins in his body.” The emphasis is on his physical body being killed on the wooden cross. It is a mysterious phrase. I have written on this before, but it bears repeating. Many years ago, I was asked to speak at a youth service at Easter and so I sought for a visual aid through which to communicate. I produced a cross with a figure hanging on it. Nothing special there. I then copied the picture but took a black felt-marker pen and scribbled all over the area of the body so that the body could hardly be seen. The black, I explained were all of our sins being heaped on Jesus as he hung there. It was like they were being given to him, attributed to him, carried by him; it’s like they covered him, soaked into him, become one with him: he was the guilty sinner of the world. Now there is much more we could say about that picture and it is just a visual aid to try and make some sense of this incredible imagery in this verse.

Second, the effect of that, seen in the middle of the verse, is that all those sins and indeed the power of sin have been taken by Jesus and they are no longer ‘on us’.  Because we have been given a completely new and fresh start and because we are now indwelt by his Spirit, the power of Sin in us has been broken. To say we might “die to sins” means their attractive, drawing power no longer has any say in our lives. We are free to live righteously.

Third, there is this mysterious phrase at the end, that comes from Isaiah, “by his wounds you have been healed.” So often his death and resurrection are used as a parallel to what happens spiritually to us when we come to him, but here ‘being wounded’ is contrasted with ‘being healed’. On the cross he was ‘wounded’ – beaten and nailed – and it resulted in his death. The effect of his work on the cross was that in so many ways, we are ‘healed’. Whereas we lived dysfunctional lives, now they have been made orderly and good. Whereas we were out of kilter with God, now we have been reconciled to Him and He to us. Whereas we were at odds with ourselves and with other people, now we have been brought into a place of peace and harmony, and it is all because of what Jesus achieved on the cross. We say we are ‘redeemed’ and that includes all these things, achieved by Christ.

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