11. Insulted & Slandered

MEDITATIONS IN THE BEATITUDES – 11

Mt 5:11,12 Blessed are you when people insult you, persecute you and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of me. Rejoice and be glad, because great is your reward in heaven for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you.

There is dispute about whether today’s verses constitute one of the beatitudes and, in as far as it starts with “Blessed”, they are, yet beyond that they don’t have the same structure and seem to be more of the general teaching style that follows in the rest of the sermon. It also seems to simply be an extension of the last true beatitude. Why should Jesus do that? Well the previous beatitudes were clearly heart processes that lead to salvation, culminating in two practical outworkings of the Christian faith. Up to verse 10 they had all been things you could clearly see as workings of the Holy Spirit as He does His convicting work. The last beatitude however, is unique in that it isn’t His work, but the work of the enemy. For that reason Jesus’ listeners and subsequent readers, might have thought, “What? How can this be? Does he really mean this or has he just wandered in his thinking for a moment?”

The fact that he then repeats and enlarges on what he has just said, indicates that Jesus is quite serious in what he is saying and really wants us to take hold of it, and that in two particular ways. The first way is in respect of the fact of persecution itself. It is clear that the disciples had really struggled to take in what Jesus said a number of times about his own coming death. Sometimes we don’t hear things because we don’t want to hear them. We don’t like hearing bad things and persecution certainly comes in that category. So when Jesus wants us to take on board the unpleasant, he says it twice!

When he does that in these verses, he enlarges it and puts persecution in the midst of a group of things we might consider lesser forms of opposition or unpleasantness: people insulting us and speaking evil of us. The world today is very good at this and their insults will not only be to call us names but they will seek to marginalize faith and particularly seek to downgrade Christianity to the level of other world faiths. In Jesus’ time they accused him of threatening to tear down the temple in Jerusalem. Later on they accused Christians of cannibalism (eat my flesh – Jn 6:53). Today the tendency is more likely to be to ridicule the faith. In whatever form it comes it is still insult and speaking wrong of us.

The second thing that Jesus wants to ensure he conveys, because it goes against the grain, is the way we respond to such things. With outright persecution the advice might have been, “Run!” and in fact on one occasion that’s what the church in Jerusalem did (see Acts 8:1), but Jesus doesn’t say that, perhaps because it is the obvious thing and will happen anyway. We noted in the previous meditation how, later in the sermon, he told his followers to pray for those who persecute them. That really is facing up to persecution positively. Here in today’s verses it is almost worse: Rejoice and be glad. Rejoice when you are being hounded for your faith? Be glad when they are out to get you? Well that’s what Jesus says so don’t let’s try to spin it any other way!

Why rejoice? Because it puts you in the same category as all of those other servants of the Lord who, down through the years, have suffered for the faith (the prophets of the past). It puts you in the same category as Jesus himself (Jn 15:20) but, even more as we noted yesterday, there is coming a future reward for you when you enter heaven. There is indication in Scripture that we will be rewarded according to what we have done here, and especially if we have stood in the face of persecution. Perhaps, if we are going through a time of peace, we don’t appreciate this fully, yet the truth is that when you are going through it, the thought of the future eternity in heaven does help in a very real way, and the thought of our heavenly Father receiving us joyfully and praising us for the way we have coped (even if it is through His grace!) helps steady us in the face of what comes from the enemy.

So, do we only have a comfortable view of Christianity or a real view? Have we accepted the fact that there will be opposition and that God’s grace will be there for us? When people respond less than graciously towards us, do we pray graciously for them? These are very real challenges already for many people in the world today, and may become more so for many more of us in these last times.

10. The Persecuted

MEDITATIONS IN THE BEATITUDES – 10

Mt 5:10 Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

In the last meditation we said that this and the previous verse go together in that they are practical outworkings of the Christian faith. Verse 9 was about how we express our relationship with God by reaching out to others to bring them to the place where they can receive the same peace with God through Christ that we have received. This verse is about how those who do not want to know about that peace respond hostilely to us.

Nobody likes the thought of persecution yet it is a part of the Christian experience. Jesus told his disciples, “If they persecuted me, they will persecute you also.” (Jn 15;20). The apostle Paul taught, “everyone who wants to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted.” (2 Tim 3:12). Persecution is purposeful opposition and the reason for it is given in our verse today and the verse we’ve just quoted. We will be opposed because we live righteous and godly lives and that righteousness and godliness shows up the unrighteousness and ungodliness in the people of the world who have set their hearts against God. In the same way they rejected Jesus’ goodness, so they will reject ours. However when we read the New Testament, we should also note that as much as there were times of persecution (Jn 4:1-, 5:17-, 6:12-, 8:1, 9:23, 12:1- etc) there were also times where, with the blessing of God, the church knew favour with the people and peace (Acts 2:47, 9:31).

Is it possible to win the favour of the people? Yes, it clearly is, by expressing God’s love and power and goodness to bring blessing to the world. Nevertheless there will be those who, despite this, will rise up against God’s people because that love and goodness shows them up for what they are. There will be those who are open to the enemy and will be used by him to make life uncomfortable for believers. However, the worst that they can do is kill God’s people and in both the early church and today there are martyrs for the faith. Some people God does allow to walk through death – Stephen (Acts 6 & 7) was an example of this. Others the Lord delivers miraculously – Peter was an example of this (Acts 12) though tradition has it that he was eventually put to death for his faith, as did ten of the eleven remaining apostles – John being the exception, who died of old age in exile.

How should we view persecution? Well not as something we should bring upon ourselves by our insensitive and careless speaking or behaviour, for we should always seek to express the love and grace and humility of God. The apostles considered it something that should not hinder them (see their prayer in Acts 4:23 -30) and in fact they rejoiced that God trusted them to cope with it (Acts 5:41). Rather than be negative about it, Jesus instructed that we should be positive and pray for those who persecute us (Mt 5:44). Note, pray FOR not against. Paul added, “Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse.” (Rom 12;14) How powerful is that! Don’t curse people the enemy uses, but seek God’s blessing on them. Pray for them to come to know Christ. Ask God to bless them. That is the instruction of the New Testament.

You want a reward? Yours is the kingdom of heaven! Yes, when we suffer for Christ, he comes close and manifests his presence, manifests the presence of heaven, the rule of God from heaven, here on earth. This is both a now and then thing. It is ‘now’ in that we will know the sovereign move of God in whatever way He decides to come in the present circumstances (e.g. “After they prayed, the place where they were meeting was shaken. And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit and spoke the word of God boldly.” Acts 4:31), and it is ‘then’ in that there is a place reserved for us in eternity. The writer to the Hebrews tells us, “Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him endured the cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God.(Heb 12:3).

How did Jesus endure the persecution of the Cross? Well, one way was to look beyond it to what would follow. Similarly for us, history shows us that often those who were being persecuted looked beyond what was happening to what they would receive at the end. In the meantime the apostle Paul coped by the knowledge of God saying to him, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.(2 Cor 12:9). In the trial of persecution, the word and history testify to this truth, that whatever God puts before us, or allows to be put before us, His grace will be there for us to help us see it through. Until it happens we can’t imagine it, but it WILL be there. Fear not, the Lord said, “Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.” (Heb 13:5).

9. The Peacemakers


Mt 5:9 Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called sons of God.

Consider the order again: awareness of spiritual poverty, grieving for that state, acceptance of God’s will, yearning for His goodness, acceptance of all others in the face of my own failing and His will, and purity of desire for God. The different facets of this process of coming to salvation start with recognition of our plight (v.3,4), then rejection of our old life and desiring for God’s way (v.5,6), which then move on to characteristics of the seeking heart as seen in its attitude to others and towards God (v.7,8). Each of these is an indication of the convicting work of God’s Holy Spirit as He seeks to draw us to God through Christ.

Today’s verse is a further such characteristic that blends attitude towards God and towards others but which really is more than attitude; it is action and as such will form the first of the two final beatitudes that are about living out the Christian faith. First of all we have to see what God is doing. He is working by His Spirit to reconcile us to Himself and bring us to a place of peace with Him: “For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross.(Col 1:19,20). Peace with God is one of the key results of the work of Jesus applied in our lives. Now when that comes and a person is born again, what we so often see is a desire in that person for that peace to come to others. This being a bringer-of-peace or being a peacemaker, isn’t about bringing warring parties together in a global conflict, as good as that is. This peace is the peace of salvation. When this peace comes all sorts of other peace situations can follow, but the bringer of peace, or the peacemaker, is a bringer of the Gospel experience, of the knowledge of the love of God. That’s what a true peacemaker does; they bring others to the place of ultimate peace – peace with their Maker.

But why should they do that? They do that because of the work of the Holy Spirit working within them. The Father desires all peoples to come to know this peace (Rom 16:20a, 2 Pet 3:9b), the Son died to bring peace (see Col 1:20 above), and the Holy Spirit works in our minds to put us at peace (Rom 8:6, Gal 5:22). How many of the letters of the apostles start with the desire for ‘grace and peace? For example, “Grace and peace to you from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Paul – Eph 1:2). “Grace and peace be yours in abundance(Peter – 1 Pet 1:2). “Grace, mercy and peace from God the Father and from Jesus Christ” (John – 2 Jn 1:3). Even James added in, “Peacemakers who sow in peace raise a harvest of righteousness” (Jas 3:18). All the apostles realized that peace was a crucial issue in the Christian life and its outworking started with being brought to peace with God through Jesus’ work on the Cross, and peace would then be an ongoing experience of the Christian’s daily relationship with God.

But what about the second part of the verse? “They will be called sons of God.” Why? Because sons exhibit the same characteristics as their father and so Christians will exhibit this same desire to bring peace to others, through Jesus’ work, that the Father desires. The bringers of this ultimate peace as doing the same work of the Father that Jesus did. Everything Jesus did was ultimately bringing people into the knowledge of God his Father, and in that knowledge, have peace. In the Old Testament times, ‘sons’ were known as those who carried on their fathers’ businesses. That is why we are sometimes referred to as sons (regardless of gender); it is a reminder that we are adopted to become like our Father in heaven and to do His work, and carry on His business, here on earth. That is the significance of ‘sonship’ (and if you have gender issue problems, remember we’re all, regardless of gender, part of the ‘bride’ of Christ!).

So, to conclude, if the Holy Spirit is truly bringing change in us as He convicts, there will be a change in attitude towards all others (v.7), there will be a wholeheartedness towards God (v.8) and now there will be a looking outwards to bring the same peace we are experiencing into the lives of those around us. Thus we become peacemakers. Are you?

8. The Pure in Heart

MEDITATIONS IN THE BEATITUDES – 8

Mt 5:8 Blessed are the pure in heart, for they will see God.

Many of the key words in the Beatitudes are not words in common usage today. Perhaps this says more about us today than about the beatitudes. The idea of purity, or the word ‘pure’ is one such example. Purity is something that only gets referred to when we are talking about gold or silver, very rarely about qualities of our lives. However, that concept, of purity of gold or silver, does help us understand something more about what is being said in today’s verse. All of the early uses of ‘pure’ in the Bible are to do with “pure gold” that was used in the construction of the tabernacle. Forty times in the historical books in the first half of the Old Testament there are references to “pure gold”, gold without any impurities, the very best, the very finest gold possible. That was to be the quality of material used in connection with the worship place of God.

But our verse refers to purity of heart. Now Vines Expository Dictionary identifies ‘heart’ as meaning, the ‘inner man’ (Deut 30:14), and the seat of ‘desire or inclination’ (Ex 7:14), the ‘emotions’ (Deut 6:5), ‘knowledge and wisdom’ (Deut 8:5), ‘conscience and moral character’ (Job 27:6), ‘rebellion and pride’ (Gen 8:21 ).

Now remember we have said again and again that we must see each verse in context, as a follow on from what has gone before. In the previous meditations we said that there was a submission to the will of God and a desire to receive God’s righteousness, and then having a merciful attitude towards all others as an indication of the reality of understanding of our spiritual poverty and need for God. One of the key verses in the Old Testament that is pertinent here is, “Man looks at the outward appearance, but the LORD looks at the heart” (1 Sam 16:7). As we come to God to receive His salvation, the Lord closely examines us to see how effective the convicting work of His Holy Spirit is. Having a merciful attitude towards others is one good indicator, but our attitude towards God is the key thing, and that is where this verse applies.

So, to quote what we said about what we find in Vines Dictionary, the Lord looks on the inner person (as our verse above says). He looks to see the reality of the desire that is there. It is only when our desire for his salvation is pure or real, that He gives it to us, and of course He is the only one who can see that reality. Perhaps that is why some people appear to come to a place of commitment but don’t seem to ‘come through’.

The Lord also looks at the reality of our emotions. How pure are they? Are our tears, tears of remorse, tears of having been found out, revealed for who we are, or are they tears of genuine contrition, tears of anguish over the awfulness of who we are? The Lord alone knows the reality of our emotions at that point.

The Lord also examines our knowledge, the awareness of our state. Some people in big meetings have an emotional experience but there is no content to it. They do not know why they are feeling what they are feeling, but when we truly come to Christ under the conviction of his Holy Spirit, we know that we are sinners, we know that we are lost, we know that we are helpless and we know that only God can help us.

The Lord also looks at our conscience, our desire for moral standing. This is very similar to the previous one – He looks to see that we are going beyond mere emotions, that our cry is a genuine cry from deep down to be put morally right.

Finally the Lord looks deep inside us to see if, at the moment of conviction, there is a genuine dying to the old rebellious nature. When the Lord sees that, He knows that we are truly sincere and willing to forsake the past and let Him bring us a new life.

The second half of the verse gives us an amazing promise: they will see God .. The first implication is that when God sees this heart purity we have been considering, He then reveals Himself to us. By His own Holy Spirit coming to indwell us (Jn 14:17, 1 Cor 3:16) He enables us to have the most intimate relationship possible. “See” in that sense would simply mean ‘experience’. In the longer term, the promise of the New Testament is that when we die we will go to heaven and there we will see the Lord face to face. Purity of heart opens the way for the Lord to bring us His salvation, the ultimate expression of which is eternal life with Him in heaven. Yes, we have years to live out that relationship here on earth and possibly through dreams and visions we will ‘see’ the Lord, but the final outworking of that relationship is a face to face encounter in eternity in heaven. That is our destiny; that is the destiny of those who come to the place of purity of heart.

7. The Merciful

MEDITATIONS IN THE BEATITUDES – 7

Mt 5:7 Blessed are the merciful, for they will be shown mercy.

Mercy is not a word that is often used in modern living. Justice, maybe, but not mercy. In the Bible mercy comes up at certain significant places: “For I desire mercy, not sacrifice” (Hos 6:6) was God’s call to His wayward people. Jesus chastised the hard hearted Pharisees with this same verse: “ go and learn what this means: `I desire mercy, not sacrifice.’ For I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners.(Mt 9:13) and again, “If you had known what these words mean, `I desire mercy, not sacrifice,’ you would not have condemned the innocent.(Mt 12:7). A blind beggar called out, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” (Lk 18:38). So what is mercy? Mercy is exercising a benign attitude towards another when all the circumstances would expect punishment or harm or judgement that fairness or justice would naturally demand. Yes, that is mercy; it is not something earned or deserved or warranted, it is just given.

Now something important to note here is that God is described in the Bible as merciful: “Let us fall into the hands of the LORD, for his mercy is great(2 Sam 24:14) and “the LORD your God is a merciful God ” (Deut 4:31 ) and “Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful.(Lk 6:36) That last verse shows why this is significant. God is a merciful God and He wants His children to be merciful. The most extreme act of God’s mercy towards the human race is His sending Jesus to save us. We deserve death, we deserve punishment for our sins. God didn’t have to send a substitute to carry our sins and our punishment. We didn’t earn it, and we didn’t deserve it. It was just something God just decided to do, an act of pure mercy. Can you see this, it is very important? You might say that love drives mercy, but otherwise in our natural thinking it is totally illogical. Justice demands we be destroyed, but God decides otherwise and makes His plans accordingly, which results in Jesus taking our sin so that justice is seen to be done, but the whole setting up the means of salvation is an act of pure mercy.

Now we are ready to consider our verse today. Having seen each additional beatitude as a further step in the process that opens the way for God to bring salvation to us, we should think of this verse similarly. What have we said were the steps so far? They are to recognize our spiritual poverty (v.3), to anguish over it (v.4), to be open to the will of God (v.5), and to yearn for God way of righteousness (v.6). Yes those are the steps. Now what we have in today’s verse is a proof of a right heart attitude. We can say we are open to God’s will and we can say we want to be righteous but there is a simple and practical expression of that right living: it is to live with the same attitude towards others that God has. When we come to Christ and are made aware, by the conviction of his Holy Spirit, of our sin and our failure, when that truly takes hold of us as the mourning indicates it does, at that point our sense of failure will mean that we will have no negatives towards any other person; all we will be aware of is our own failure, our own inadequacy, our own weakness. At that point we are willing to be utterly merciful in our attitudes towards others because we realize we have no grounds whatsoever to think ourselves better than any other person. It is in the midst of conviction that we become merciful; it is part of the process.

It is when God sees this attitude within us that He knows our heart change is genuine. Our becoming merciful is a proof that the Holy Spirit is having effect in us, and that is a sign that we are truly becoming ready to accept God’s will, and accept His Holy Spirit into our lives. This is an initial sign that we are willing to become like our heavenly Father, to become His children. It is at that point that God exercises His mercy and all of the work of Jesus on the Cross is applied to us, not because we deserve it – because we don’t – but simply because God in His love wants to bring it. Thus we receive mercy.

What is tragic is that, as we go on in the Christian faith, so many of us forget this phase in our salvation and start looking down on people. We become just like the judgmental Pharisees and think we are better than those who have not yet come to Christ, or better than those we perceive to be ‘less mature’ than ourselves. We need to come back to this verse and remind ourselves of the basic truths here. If need be, reread this meditation and ensure you fully understand what is being said, and then ensure you apply it every day of your Christian life.

6. Those who Hunger

MEDITATIONS IN THE BEATITUDES – 6

Mt 5:6 Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled.

To catch the full import of this verse we need to recount the previous three verses and see this one in context. First there had been the requirement to recognize our spiritual poverty. Second, simply recognizing it was not sufficient, there had to be a mourning or grieving over it that showed we understood how awful being dead spiritually was. Third, and following that, there had to be a willingness to submit utterly to God’s will, for nothing less than that could open the way up for His blessings to flow into our lives.

But now comes a further aspect of the same thing. If on one hand we saw and rejected our old lives, recognizing the failure to be good that there was in that life, what there also needs to be is a yearning for the good life, for a life that is good and right. Do you see the importance of these stages? You can be aware of your poverty and just wallow in that and remain there. You can see it and anguish over it but be unable to let go your self-centredness and so you stay there in it. You can be aware of your poverty, mourn over it and want God’s will and yet only desire it for what it can bring you – and that is still self-centred.

To go the whole way you have to come to this point of submitting to God’s will whole-heartedly and yearning for a right standing before God. That is what righteousness is – right standing before God, right living before God. Again, do you see the two aspects there? When we become aware of our poverty, aware of our failure, aware of our guilt, for the work to be fully done, there also needs to be a yearning to be freed from the guilt and shame and to be put right with God. In the awareness of our spiritual poverty there also needs to be the recognition that it involves sin against God. Do you remember in Jesus’ parable of the Prodigal Son, when the son returns to his father he declares, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you.(Lk 15:21). When the Holy Spirit brings conviction it is not merely of our failure, but our failure in respect of God. As we realize that, we understand we have offended God and that needs to be put right. Somehow we need to be reconciled to God – but we cannot do it ourselves. It is only as we hear the good news of Jesus dying on the Cross in our place that we realize that the Father alone has provided the means for us to come back into a right standing with Him.

But there will also be a yearning to change our way of living, to get rid of things that offend God, and to live rightly before Him. Behind this hungering and thirsting, this heart yearning, there will also be this desire to lead a good life, a life free from sin. The New Testament shows us the nature of that life, and particularly the apostles’ letters put detail to that, but the main thing we find, is that God provides His own Holy Spirit to live within us, so He is there to direct and guide us, to show us the way in any particular situation, He is there to empower us to enable us to overcome and live as God’s child. Whether we recognize it or not when we look back, this is the work the Holy Spirit does in us when He convicts us of our need – a recognition of our poverty, an anguish over it, a desire for God’s will and a desire to be put right with God so that we can live the life He wants us to live, as His children. Those are the facets of what goes on within any person as they come to God to be born again.

And this is where we come to the latter part of the verse: they shall be filled. When someone is hungry, they are empty. When their hunger is satisfied, they are filled. It is a picture of being completely satisfied. At the end of a banquet, people are heard to say, “That was wonderful, I am full up. I couldn’t eat another thing!” And that’s the truth; when God does His work in us He does it completely and there is nothing more to be added. Every aspect of what we have considered has been covered. From being poor isolated wretches we become children of God with all the blessings of God. Our mourning is turned into rejoicing. We rest and rejoice in coming into the purposeful will of God, where we sense a new purpose and direction in our lives. The yearning to be put right with God is completely satisfied as we are declared forgiven, cleansed and totally pardoned and, as the Holy Spirit comes in, we are energized to live the new life. We are filled, we are utterly satisfied. Yes, we are filled with the goodness of God and of His Holy Spirit as we submit ourselves to Him and let Him do what He wants with us. How wonderful when it happens, how scary for the person who wants to remain in their self-centred isolation!

5. The Meek

MEDITATIONS IN THE BEATITUDES – 5

Mt 5:5 Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth.

‘Meek’ and ‘meekness’ are words rarely heard in the English language today and, indeed, the NIV only uses the word ‘meek’ three times, one of which is in our verse today. The only time the word ‘meekness’ is used is, “By the meekness and gentleness of Christ, I appeal to you” (2 Cor 10:1). The NIV tends to use instead the words ‘gentleness’ and ‘humble’ though these don’t convey quite the same meaning. A dictionary definition of ‘meek’ is ‘humble and submissive’ and therein is the key to this verse. For instance, older versions of the Bible translate Num 12:3 as “Now the man Moses was very meek, above all the men that were upon the face of the earth.When the modern versions say he was very ‘humble’ they do not catch the particular characteristic of Moses that made him such a great man.

When we study Moses, one of the things that kept happening during his leadership of the new people of Israel, was that people grumbled or even rebelled. In every situation except one, Moses immediately turned to the Lord and submitted the problem to Him. This wasn’t just humility, this was submissiveness to God. Similarly when Paul above refers to the meekness of Christ, he is referring to his example of being totally submitted to his Father’s will.

Negatively, meekness is the absence of self-assertiveness and self-concern. Positively it is that acceptance of the will of God over all things. When people, as in Moses’ examples, rise up against us, the meek person simply goes to the Lord with the problem and accepts this as something the Lord has so far allowed to happen. Meekness is a characteristic of the prayer the believers prayed in Acts 4:23-30. They had just been threatened by the religious leaders and as they come to pray, they DON‘T pray against those religious leaders, they simply acclaim the Lord’s greatness (v.24-26) and then declared their acceptance of all that had happened as being God’s will (v.27-28) and simply asked God to give them boldness to declare the Gospel while God would do signs and wonders (v.29,30). Observe that in all that they simply sought the Lord’s will in all things. So how does this fit in with the previous beatitudes?

First there was the need for a recognition of our spiritual poverty, second there was the requirement that that be accompanied by a mourning or grieving for that spiritual poverty, and now third, there is the requirement of coming to a place of submitting totally to God’s will. That surely is one of the primary requirements for a person to come to Christ, that they submit to God’s way of salvation, through Christ on the Cross, and allow him to lead them from that time on. How simple those words: “allow him to lead them”. What does it mean? It means that Christ will lead us by his Holy Spirit to bring our lives in line with his Father’s will. This means a change in character, a change in attitude, a change in desires, a change in goals, a change in behaviour. It is a complete submission to God’s plan for our individual lives. As we go through life and upsets come, we turn to the Lord and ask, “What do you want here, Lord?” That is meekness.

But what about the second part of the verse? Inherit the earth? When we speak of an inheritance we mean something that is coming to us that has been left to us following the death of a family member. In this case, as a result of Jesus’ death, it means all that is now ours as a result of what Jesus has achieved on the Cross (to see this more fully, go to the series of meditations that consider the effects of Jesus’ work on the Cross). Now part of this, which many people miss, is that as a result of God’s work of salvation in us, we start to enjoy living, we start to enjoy this world, in a completely new way. We start to appreciate life, we start to appreciate this world as God’s wonderful provision for us.

“The earth” is shorthand for, everything God has provided for us on this planet. No longer are we struggling and striving to get pleasure, to achieve, to get on top of this world. Suddenly now, as we submit ourselves to God’s perfect will for our lives, we start enjoying life in a new way. There is peace, harmony, contentment, enjoyment. As we come to rest in God’s will we inherit life, new life, stress-free life, peaceful life, harmonious life, here and now. What a blessing! That all comes as we give ourselves to the Lord and to His will. That is meekness and that opens the doorway for God to bring to us the blessings of life in this world that He desires to bring. Enjoy!