2. Aspiring to More Grace

Aspiring Meditations: 2.  Aspiring to more grace

Psa 45:2   You are the most excellent of men and your lips have been anointed with grace, since God has blessed you forever.

2 Pet 1;2 Grace and peace be yours in abundance through the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.

In the opening, introductory ‘study’, near the end I laid out our goal about the things to which we might aspire: we will have to think what they each mean, why the Lord wants them for us, and how we may aspire to experiencing them in greater and greater measure.

So, in the example to do with my wife’s uncle, I said, ‘I realised there I was aspiring to a higher level of grace than that which I had known until then’ and so it seems natural that we start off these things looking at ‘grace’. It is a word that comes up often in Scripture, especially in the letters of the apostle Paul who always asks for grace for his recipients, as does the apostle Peter in the verse above from his second letter. It has to be high up on the list of significant words in the New Testament.

Now when we say that someone is ‘gracious’ we mean they are sociable, courteous, polite. It is a word used to describe a very positive aspect of their character. Similarly, if we looked up synonyms for ‘grace’ we come across such words as refinement, loveliness, poise, charm, again positive words about character. That is how we tend to use the word and its associates in everyday life.  Now as good as these words are, the Bible’s use of grace is much more powerful.

Our first verse above, your lips have been anointed with grace”, suggest again a very positive characteristic – because, “You are the most excellent of men,” but it is clear that this Messiah figure is like that since God has blessed you forever.” This positive characteristic is because of God’s blessing. So to recap the first two things about grace: 1. It is expressed as a positive characteristic, and 2. It comes from God. But what is it?

It is important to understand, because God calls Himself a “gracious God” (Ex 34:6) and it comes in the midst of similar words: “the LORD, the compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness, maintaining love to thousands, and forgiving wickedness.” (v .6,7) They are all different words but have the feel of being in the same family, so to speak. Now here we start becoming aware of the problem. If you take a good Bible dictionary, you find that trying to tie down the word ‘grace’ is like trying to take hold of mercury or quicksilver (don’t it’s poisonous!) where, if you put your finger on a blob of it, it splits up into lots of smaller globules which scatter in all directions. Grace is like that.

The Hebrew word in O.T. usage, ‘hesed’, has been translated, ‘mercy, kindness, loving-kindness’.  When used of a man or woman it tends to mean steadfast love towards God or another person, or even used as ‘faithfulness’. The New Testament Greek equivalent is ‘charis’ which often has links to forgiveness or mercy. Jesus never uses the word yet his actions and teaching are saturated with it.  The apostle Paul says we, “are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus.” (Rom 3:24) Note the close linkage of three crucial things: justified – by grace – through redemption. Our justification is only by an act of grace on God’s part, the redemption that Jesus earned for us on the Cross. So, redemption was an act of grace and so is justification. Christ’s redeeming act leads to our justification and both are God’s expressions of mercy, and loving kindness, free, undeserved gifts. So, we might say, grace is first a personal characteristic, or even a benignly positive attitude.

But it seems to be even more than that. Yes, in my usage of it in respect of the uncle of my wife, I might say I recognized and wanted to emulate or aspire to this same personal characteristic or benignly positive attitude, but in the New Testament it seems to have more about it. For instance, it seems foundational to who we are in the body of Christ: “We have different gifts, according to the grace given us.” (Rom 12:6) Grace there, seems more an ability, the ability to exercise a gift, or behave supernaturally.  But then all my previous attempts to tie down this globule of mercury have all also been characteristics or attitudes, that are identified by a behaviour.  Mercy, for instance is an expression or act of God in a particular way.

But then we have to ask, how do we get this grace into us, if I may put it like that? How do I get these abilities we have just referred to? The answer has to be by the indwelling presence of God’s Holy Spirit. It is Him in me that is the resource that enables me to live out my Christian life, my life in relation to the Lord, expressed in everyday behaviour. Later on in these studies we will look at things that are said to be ‘fruit of the Spirit’ (Gal 5:22,23).  Now fruit naturally grows. The only two commands linked to those verses speak of being “led by the Spirit,” (v.18) and “let us keep in step with the Spirit.” (v.25) so we may conclude that when we allow the Spirit to lead us and we seek to keep in step with what HE is doing, then the things in verses 22 and 23 will naturally start developing and appearing in us.

We would probably be remiss if we didn’t mention the apostle Paul’s famous incident when he pleaded with God to help with a particular weakness but the Lord replied, “But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” (2 Cor 12:9). So grace is equated with power – God’s power, the power released by the Holy Spirit within us. So when we need wisdom or maybe strength, or perhaps patience, all of these are expression of grace that the Spirit provides.

So to summarise: grace is a characteristic AND a resource that is seen when expressed through Christ-like acts. In a variety of ways my wife’s uncle expressed Christ. It will be developed more and more in me as I seek to be obedient to God’s word and His Holy Spirit’s prompting. Yes, as the apostle Paul says in both Ephesians and Colossians, I have a part to play by putting to death the characteristics of the ‘old nature’ and in ‘putting on’ the Christ-characteristics that his Spirit wishes to express in and through us. I still aspire to be the gracious elderly man that I saw in my wife’s uncle. I recognize that the way that grace is shown in me, will be different from the way it is shown in you when it comes to gifts and service (Rom 12:6) but in terms of character we all have this overall sense of what it means to be Christ-like – full of loving kindness, full of mercy, full of good feelings and desires for other people and thankful to God our Father and, yes, summarized as full of grace! Let’s aspire to be like this, more and more.

1. Introducing Aspiring

Aspiring Meditations: 1.  Introducing Aspiring

2 Pet 1:5-8   make every effort to add to your faith goodness; and to goodness, knowledge; and to knowledge, self-control; and to self-control, perseverance; and to perseverance, godliness; and to godliness, brotherly kindness; and to brotherly kindness, love. For if you possess these qualities in increasing measure, they will keep you from being ineffective and unproductive in your knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.

A number of years ago we attended the ninetieth birthday of an uncle of my wife. I had met him only a few times but he came over as a gracious old man. I had picked up along the way that he had been a farmer, and had been a Christian all his life. When his wife reached seventy she suffered major memory loss, didn’t even know him, became bed bound and incontinent, but he refused to have her put into a home and so cared for her day and night for ten years until she passed away.

When we came to his birthday celebration we knew he attended a small church on the south coast, looked after the elderly of the church (!!!), led Bible studies, attended a weekly house group, and once a term went to a local junior school and took their ‘Assembly’ for them. At this celebration, which was a gathering of the wider family and a few close friends for the whole day in someone’s large house, we sat around chatting with people and caught up on the passing years. In the middle of the afternoon Tea was being served and a big birthday cake was brought in with lots of candles which, of course, he was required to blow out.  This was typically followed by someone calling out, “Speech, speech”, the traditional call for the ‘celebrity to say a few words.

In the next ten minutes, and it was only ten minutes, he gave his testimony of how he came to the Lord as a child, how the Lord had kept him through all the years of his life, and shared the basic Gospel, concluding with a very funny joke that made you laugh but at the same time confronted you with a challenge as to what your life was founded upon, and then he sat down to applause. About half the people there, I believe, were not believers. Knowing what I knew about him and witnessing this episode, I found myself praying, “Lord, I have at last found someone I would want to emulate. I don’t know how many years you have got for me, but please use me in some way every day, like you have done with this gracious old man.”

As I pondered over this in the following months I realised there I was aspiring to a higher level of grace than that which I had known until then. Then as I pondered on that, I realised that Scripture is full of things that the Lord wants us to aspire to, and so that is what this new series is about. It takes the general concept, that is clear in the New Testament, that the Lord expects growth in us and growth means that next year, say, I can be experiencing His grace in some form, more than I do today.

In his second letter, the apostle Peter gives us this list of things in the verses above that he wants us to aspire to, things he wants us to develop in our lives. Now this is the thing about the Christian life: the Lord has provided for us and so it is down to us to appropriate all that He has given us in Christ, but that is an ongoing process.  Now whether those things in Peter’s list are things that are ‘one after another’ that come out of or flow from the previous one, or whether they are just facets of being Christ-like, I leave you to ponder: faith, goodness; knowledge, self-control, perseverance, godliness, brotherly kindness, and love.

There are various of these ‘lists’ in the New Testament, for example, “the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control.” (Gal 5:22,23) In Colossians the apostle Paul says “put to death” various things of your old life (Col 3:5-9) because we have “put on the new self” (v.10) and then adds, “clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience. Bear with each other and forgive whatever grievances you may have against one another. Forgive as the Lord forgave you. And over all these virtues put on love.” (Col 3:12-14)

So, the exercise of this series is to ponder on all of these sorts of things that the Lord wants me to aspire to, and if they already exist in some measure in me, to aspire to more of them. To do that we will have to think what they each mean, why the Lord wants them for us, and how we may aspire to experiencing them in greater and greater measure.

So, I invite you to join me on this journey, of those who will aspire to greater things, the things the Lord lays out for us in His word, things with which He wants to bless us. Are you ready? Let’s go.

9. Be who God has made you to be

Short Meditations on the Body of Christ:  9. Be who God has made you to be

Rom 12:6    We have different gifts, according to the grace given us.

If churches have problems, one of them is that so often we try and cast everyone in the same mould. Now in one sense that is right for we are all being shaped into the likeness of Jesus (see 2 Cor 3:18) and as far as morals or ethics are concerned, that should be true, but the greater reality – and you see this in all of Creation – is that God loves diversity.

The apostle Paul touched on this in his famous chapter on the different parts of the body – and we will consider that more fully in the next meditation – when he speaks of us as different parts of the body: The body is a unit, though it is made up of many parts; and though all its parts are many, they form one body.” (1 Cor 12:12) and he goes on in his analogy to speak of the foot, the hand, the eye, the ear and he goes on, “But in fact God has arranged the parts in the body, every one of them, just as he wanted them to be. If they were all one part, where would the body be? As it is, there are many parts, but one body.” (1 Cor 12:18,19)

Note, “God has arranged.” The Lord gifts us, He gives us different abilities according to His grace (His Holy Spirit’s enduing with power to act in specific ways). Regular readers will know one of my favourite verses in the New Testament is, “we are God’s workmanship, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.” (Eph 2:10) We are what we are because God (through Jesus reigning at his Father’s right hand) through His Spirit, has brought us into being with different personalities, different gifts, abilities, desires etc.

Writer Gary Chapman in his “The Five Love Languages” suggests our different preferences for the way we show or receive love, or there is Patrick Morley’s, “The Six Worship Languages” that goes right back to Gordon MacDonald’s “Six leading Instincts of the Soul”, which is opened up even more by Gary Thomas’s “Sacred Pathways: Discover your Soul’s Path to God”. All of these writers grasp at the same thing – we are all different. (This has even been taken into ‘Learning Styles’ although this has been questioned by some).

Perhaps a personal application: the Bible thrills me, I come alive with it. Prophecy and preaching bless and thrill me. Worship, I long to go deeper with a greater reality. Prayer, I’m limited. Evangelism, I love sharing with those who want to know and although I have brought a number to the Lord, I grieve that it is so few and long to be gifted, but I am not. So how about you? What thrills you in the Christian life? Build on that. What gives you a buzz? Develop it.

87. A Sign for the Rebellious

Meditations in Exodus: 87.  A Sign for the Rebellious

Num 17:10  The LORD said to Moses, “Put back Aaron’s staff in front of the Testimony, to be kept as a sign to the rebellious. This will put an end to their grumbling against me, so that they will not die”

In the previous chapter we observed the plague that was coming as God’s judgment after the Lord had threatened to judge all the people for their grumbling, but as the priests interceded for them, the Lord had mercy on them and the plague was stopped. We marveled at why the Lord had not finished completely with this people. It might be helpful to itemize again the order of the things that had recently happened:

  • They arrived at Kadesh on the border of the Promised Land (Num 13), spies had gone in and ten of the twelve brought back a bad report that swayed the nation who then refused to enter the Land (Num 14).
  • Because of this the Lord decreed that the whole of the nation over the age of twenty would die in the wilderness in the coming years and the younger generation would only enter when the older generations had eventually died out. (Num 14:29-35)
  • Subsequent to this, presumably still at Kadesh but it may be later, Korah and at least 250 community leaders had risen up against Moses and Aaron and had been destroyed when the earth swallowed them up (Num 16).
  • Incredibly this was followed by the people grumbling against Moses (16:41) and when the Lord sent plague against them, it was only stopped by Moses getting Aaron as High Priest to make atonement. (16:46-50)

Thus we arrive at a point of time when Israel are consigned to a life in the desert, have been on the verge of being wiped out by the Lord for their ongoing rebellious attitude, and are teetering on the brink of existence. What will they do? What will the Lord do? How can they carry on?

Our verse above explains what follows as the Lord’s activity seeking to end their grumbling so that they will not yet be destroyed. The Lord proposes a strategy whereby His will and the sanctity of the priesthood will prevail. Observe:

The LORD said to Moses, “Speak to the Israelites and get twelve staffs from them, one from the leader of each of their ancestral tribes. Write the name of each man on his staff. On the staff of Levi write Aaron’s name, for there must be one staff for the head of each ancestral tribe. Place them in the Tent of Meeting in front of the Testimony, where I meet with you. The staff belonging to the man I choose will sprout, and I will rid myself of this constant grumbling against you by the Israelites.” (Num 17:1-5) It is very simple. Each tribal leader is to present their staff with their name on it – and Levi’s will have Aaron’s name on it. These staffs are to be put in the Tent of Meeting overnight and whoever’s staff buds by next morning will be the one chosen by the Lord. That will put an end to all the grumbling about who is a leader and who is not. This they do (v.6,7)

What follows is amazing: “The next day Moses entered the Tent of the Testimony and saw that Aaron’s staff, which represented the house of Levi, had not only sprouted but had budded, blossomed and produced almonds.” (v.8) It is undoubtedly a miracle because it not only budded, but leaves had formed AND blossom AND fruit appear on it.

Moses takes all the other staffs and gives them back to their owners – unchanged! – and the Lord tells him to put Aaron’s in the Tent as an ongoing reminder to everyone that Aaron, the high priest is His chosen on. (Num 17:9-11) The impact on the leaders and the people is instructive and obvious: “The Israelites said to Moses, “We will die! We are lost, we are all lost! Anyone who even comes near the tabernacle of the LORD will die. Are we all going to die?” (v.12,13)

Now, interestingly, they are not given an answer, or at least one is not recorded. What is recorded is Aaron, his sons and his future sons, and the Levites being appointed to serve in the Tabernacle for the centuries to come.  The Lord is very specific: “You are to be responsible for the care of the sanctuary and the altar, so that wrath will not fall on the Israelites again.” (Num 18:5) The priesthood is to be the means of the salvation of the Israelites by providing atonement for them whenever they sin (stated elsewhere). The rest of the chapter is about how they are to be provided for, not ever having land of their own. Chapter 19 is all about killing and burning a red heifer, a cow, outside the camp and using its ashes as a cleaning agent in water whenever uncleanness occurs. It is simply a law about maintaining or regaining cleanliness. In other words the whole emphasis swings away for a couple of chapters away from the failures of Israel to the Lord’s provision for them of a priesthood which they have already seen can stand in for them and preserve them when, in reality, they deserve death.

The whole affair of the staffs, and the laws that follow establishing the priesthood, clearly speak of the Lord’s grace that is doing everything it can to preserve this foolish people. We may wonder about this because they are a people condemned to die in the wilderness – well the older generation at least – but what we have here are the Lord’s actions to head off further folly which could contaminate the younger generation. The Lord’s intent is for that younger generation to grow up in the wilderness, to learn from it all, and be ready to go in and take the Land when the older generation has died off. All we have been reading about has been the Lord’s activity, working to help bring that about. How amazing!  This is the God of grace and mercy with whom we have to deal. Praise and worship Him!

65. Strengthened by Grace

Meditations in Hebrews 13:  65.  Strengthened by Grace

Heb 13:9b   It is good for our hearts to be strengthened by grace, not by ceremonial foods, which are of no value to those who eat them.

Relevant? I suspect that for many of us, when we come to a verse like this we think it is of little relevance because it talks of something – ceremonial foods – that was part of their lives back then when this was written but is not something for today. Fair enough. However, as this verse has stayed on my radar I conclude that actually it is very important for our lives today. Perhaps we should deal with the Jewish-Christian context language and pictures that are used, first of all, and then go on to see modern parallels for us as Christians.

Clean? I like the version of verse 9 that says: Your spiritual strength comes as a gift from God, not from ceremonial rules about eating certain foods—a method which, by the way, hasn’t helped those who have tried it!”  i.e. there were various of Moses’ Laws that referred to clean or unclean foods and, although people like the Pharisees insisted these were important, they didn’t seem to work very well and Jesus insisted that ‘cleanness’ was about an inner thing not an outward observance and, anyway, keeping those rules had not produced a holy people.

In the Tabernacle? But then our writer says something even more irrelevant by today’s standards: “We have an altar from which those who minister at the tabernacle have no right to eat.” (v.10) Pardon? What does that mean?  Well the priests ate at the altar and so in this analogy the writer says we have a place where we eat (or fellowship) with God that those who served in the tabernacle in the Old Testament under the old covenant, could not eat. They went through the outward rituals (like the cleansing and worshipping rituals) but in reality that did not seem to bring them closer to God.  Our ‘altar’ is the Cross. The physical altar was the place where the sacrifice was offered and the NT teaching is that Christ was the ‘Lamb of God’ offered for the ‘sacrifice of sins’ that we have considered previously. Altars have no place in Christianity for they are reminiscent of the old covenant.

Blood & a Carcass? He goes on, “The high priest carries the blood of animals into the Most Holy Place as a sin offering, but the bodies are burned outside the camp.” (v.11)  It gets worse!  But remember this was originally for a Jewish-Christian congregation, so let’s try to understand how they would have understood it. Yes, there were two parts to this procedure. The blood of the animal, which represents its life power, was taken into the Most Holy Place to say to God, a life has been given to allow this access. That was to prefigure the work of Christ, giving up his life on the Cross. But then the remaining physical body of the animal was taken outside the camp and burned there, almost as if to say, the physical body of this creature is of no importance, it is its life that is important.

The writer then explains the application: “And so Jesus also suffered outside the city gate to make the people holy through his own blood.” (v.12) Jesus’ physical body was taken outside the city and there he was crucified in a place of disgrace, as a criminal. It appeared, we might say, that God was giving up on the body of Christ, allowing it to be destroyed just like the old covenant practice, but in reality what was happening on the Cross was that Christ was giving his eternal life as a sacrifice for the sins of the world, taking our punishment there.

The writer concludes this little cameo of doctrine by saying, “Let us, then, go to him outside the camp, bearing the disgrace he bore.” (v.13) i.e. let us identify with Christ, accepting (contrary to the derision of the world) that his death on the Cross bought our forgiveness.  The preaching of the cross is, I know, nonsense to those who are involved in this dying world, but to us who are being saved from that death it is nothing less than the power of God.” (1 Cor 1:18 JBP version) It is that simple.

Back to Grace: So now we need to come back to our starting point: It is good for our hearts to be strengthened by grace, not by ceremonial foods.” (v.9b) We, like the Old Testament saints, need strengthening, need encouraging. The Old Testament believers resorted to sacrifices and offerings to get their consciences right before God and yet somehow it left doubts and the overall picture of the spiritual life of Israel throughout the Old Testament is mostly not good.

Today we have these concrete facts declared throughout the New Testament – that Christ died for the forgiveness of sins on the Cross, a specific historical event, the specific plan of God for our salvation. This comes to us freely so that we have to do nothing but accept the truth of this. THIS is what grace is all about so when the enemy comes against us with doubts and fears, we simply turn to the facts of the Gospel and rely on them.

No ‘Doing’ to Impress God: Now the problem is that many of us like to DO things to make us feel right with God, so we resort to such things as ‘trying to be good’ or ‘performing religious rituals’ (Sunday by Sunday) or ‘trying to make up for our bad aspects’ (doing charitable things) but the truth is that when we do that we put ourselves on a par with those Old Testament people worrying about ceremonial food. We look to ‘things’ to put us right with God, but Christianity is all about receiving freely from God.

If you are trying to be good to get on God’s good side, if you are going to church to get on God’s good side, or if you are doing charitable things to get on God’s good side, then STOP IT! Simply believe that He loves you and is for you and HAS made you right with Him through the Cross, and believe that He HAS given you His Holy Spirit who is the source of all power, all wisdom, all guidance, and all teaching. Learn to listen to Him and enjoy the wonder of being His child. Amen? Amen!

16. Peace in Trials?

Short Meditations on Peace 16. Peace in Trials?

Jas 1:2-4     Count it all joy, my brothers, when you meet trials of various kinds, for you know that the testing of your faith produces steadfastness. And let steadfastness have its full effect, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing.

Now there are (let’s be real!) times when we go through trials and testings, and those times are not easy. In fact, it might be legitimate to ask, is it possible to have peace in the time of trial?

Again, seeking to be real, I suspect the honest answer has to be, initially at least, probably not. Why? Because these things tend to come to us out of the blue, so to speak, without warning and the first thing we know is that things seem to be going wrong. Worry!

Remember Paul’s words to the Philippians: “The Lord is at hand; do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.” (Phil 4:4-7) Challenging words that start with the suggestion that God is there, on our case – but we are anxious, otherwise we wouldn’t need Paul’s words. His counsel: pray and God’s peace will come.

But it’s a difficult trial? How can peace come? Perhaps first by recognising that it is a trial and such things are either brought or allowed by God and if that is so, the Lord is looking for you to pass the test. God isn’t out to pull you down, He’s there to build you up, He wants you to pass this test, to succeed in it, to triumph in adversity.

What is going on when a test comes?  God is wanting you to learn, to realise just who you are, a child of God with all of His resources available to you. Be at peace in it – He’s in control and He’s standing there holding out His resources to you to take.

Remember, through the Cross of Christ He has provided absolutely everything you need to see you through life: “God is able to bless you abundantly, so that in all things at all times, having all that you need, you will abound in every good work.” (2 Cor 9:8) He tells us He has a plan for us: “For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.” (Eph 2:10) Life is no accident. With God there is purpose.

So to conclude, God’s got a plan for you, He’s with you and He’s provided everything you might need for any and every circumstance, and that includes times that are trials or testings, and so you can be at peace in them, once you realise what is going on and understand the dynamics of God’s love that comes to us in this way sometimes. He’s allowing this for your blessing. Rejoice in it as such.

47. Faith opens the door to Grace

Meditations on ‘Focusing Faith’ : 47.  Faith Opens the Door to Grace

Rom 5:1,2 “Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have gained access by faith into this grace in which we now stand.” (Rom 5:1,2)

Let’s take some short cuts and try defining grace from the outset. You may have heard the Sunday School acronym,  GRACE = God’s Riches at Christ’s Expense or to put it another way, all of God resources that are available to us through what Christ achieved for us on the Cross. Put even another way, it is the abiding presence of the Holy Spirit within us who provides us with all we need to live out the Christ-like and Christ-directed life. Put like that we can see just how important grace is in the life of the Christian.

Indeed when we examine the Scriptures we see it is all over the place. First of all, when we consider Jesus’ himself, it was even there: “And the child grew and became strong; he was filled with wisdom, and the grace of God was upon him.” (Lk 2:40) Now some say that grace is God’s favour, and that is true, even though I don’t think it says enough, but it was certainly true of Jesus. Indeed it would appear that in Jesus there was no limitation on this grace because, referring to his ministry, the apostle John wrote, “From the fullness of his grace we have all received one blessing after another.” (Jn 1:16) i.e. blessing after blessing came from Jesus, from that unlimited grace within him, the Son of God.

But second, when it comes to our salvation, our coming to Christ, the believers were referred to as, “those who by grace had believed.” (Acts 18:27) suggesting that is only with God’s help and God’s resources that we actually come to believe. Indeed the very Gospel is referred to as “the gospel of God’s grace.” (Acts 20:24) because that is ultimately what it is all about, God bringing us to a position where we can receive all of His goodness that He wants to share with us. We didn’t emphasize it earlier but the truth is that God’s grace is a pure gift, there is nothing we can do to earn it. Indeed the very act of justifying us that we considered previously was an act of grace, for justification is just one part of God’s resources available to us:  “for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, and are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus.” (Rom 3:23,24) As the Message version puts that, “God did it for us. Out of sheer generosity he put us in right standing with himself. A pure gift. He got us out of the mess we’re in and restored us to where he always wanted us to be. And he did it by means of Jesus Christ.” Yes, it was all a work of God.

But then third, once we come to Christ there is just as much a need of His grace for daily Christian living. So often the apostle Paul would recognise this need: Grace and peace to you from God our Father and from the Lord Jesus Christ. (Rom 1:7) and it is grace that enables us to have faith: “Therefore, the promise comes by faith, so that it may be by grace and may be guaranteed to all Abraham’s offspring–not only to those who are of the law but also to those who are of the faith of Abraham.” (Rom 4:16) Receiving the fruit if all God’s promises for us, is what Christian life is all about, which brings us to our starting verse again, Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have gained access by faith into this grace in which we now stand.” (Rom 5:1,2) Faith, we said, opens the doorway into the life of grace.

But, fourth, it is more than that, it is grace for service: “We have different gifts, according to the grace given us.” (Rom 12:6) and “I always thank God for you because of his grace given you in Christ Jesus. For in him you have been enriched in every way–in all your speaking and in all your knowledge.” (1 Cor 1:4,5) The gifts we have, the knowledge we have, the abilities we may have to speak, are all gifts of grace, freely given by God and not earned.  Indeed, says Paul, “God is able to make all grace abound to you, so that in all things at all times, having all that you need, you will abound in every good work.” (2 Cor 9:8) i.e. whatever God gives you to do, He will also provide the resources to do it.

Now let’s draw these four threads together. What is it that unites them? Faith.  All four have to be appropriated by faith. We saw in an earlier study that by faith we believe in Jesus, but here we have seen that he is THE resource provider and in him there is limitless supply. Faith flows when we accept this truth and turn to him to provide for us all we need.

Second, we spoke of grace in the coming of our salvation. To receive this free gift of God we have to accept the simple truths that we have seen previously about what Christ has done for us and what he has achieved for us, and how it now applies to us.

Third we spoke of grace being the resource we need to live out our ordinary everyday lives, revealing and exhibiting the love and goodness of God. For that to happen the grace of God has to be received on a daily basis, we need to turn to him and declare our dependence on him daily, and that is an act of faith.

Finally we spoke of grace for service and the same thing applies here. Daily we need to reiterate our complete reliance upon him to do the things he calls us to, and that is an act of faith. Everywhere faith and grace are linked together. Grace is God’s provision, and faith is the way we receive it. Hallelujah!