2. Aspiring to More Grace

Aspiring Meditations: 2.  Aspiring to more grace

Psa 45:2   You are the most excellent of men and your lips have been anointed with grace, since God has blessed you forever.

2 Pet 1;2 Grace and peace be yours in abundance through the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.

In the opening, introductory ‘study’, near the end I laid out our goal about the things to which we might aspire: we will have to think what they each mean, why the Lord wants them for us, and how we may aspire to experiencing them in greater and greater measure.

So, in the example to do with my wife’s uncle, I said, ‘I realised there I was aspiring to a higher level of grace than that which I had known until then’ and so it seems natural that we start off these things looking at ‘grace’. It is a word that comes up often in Scripture, especially in the letters of the apostle Paul who always asks for grace for his recipients, as does the apostle Peter in the verse above from his second letter. It has to be high up on the list of significant words in the New Testament.

Now when we say that someone is ‘gracious’ we mean they are sociable, courteous, polite. It is a word used to describe a very positive aspect of their character. Similarly, if we looked up synonyms for ‘grace’ we come across such words as refinement, loveliness, poise, charm, again positive words about character. That is how we tend to use the word and its associates in everyday life.  Now as good as these words are, the Bible’s use of grace is much more powerful.

Our first verse above, your lips have been anointed with grace”, suggest again a very positive characteristic – because, “You are the most excellent of men,” but it is clear that this Messiah figure is like that since God has blessed you forever.” This positive characteristic is because of God’s blessing. So to recap the first two things about grace: 1. It is expressed as a positive characteristic, and 2. It comes from God. But what is it?

It is important to understand, because God calls Himself a “gracious God” (Ex 34:6) and it comes in the midst of similar words: “the LORD, the compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness, maintaining love to thousands, and forgiving wickedness.” (v .6,7) They are all different words but have the feel of being in the same family, so to speak. Now here we start becoming aware of the problem. If you take a good Bible dictionary, you find that trying to tie down the word ‘grace’ is like trying to take hold of mercury or quicksilver (don’t it’s poisonous!) where, if you put your finger on a blob of it, it splits up into lots of smaller globules which scatter in all directions. Grace is like that.

The Hebrew word in O.T. usage, ‘hesed’, has been translated, ‘mercy, kindness, loving-kindness’.  When used of a man or woman it tends to mean steadfast love towards God or another person, or even used as ‘faithfulness’. The New Testament Greek equivalent is ‘charis’ which often has links to forgiveness or mercy. Jesus never uses the word yet his actions and teaching are saturated with it.  The apostle Paul says we, “are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus.” (Rom 3:24) Note the close linkage of three crucial things: justified – by grace – through redemption. Our justification is only by an act of grace on God’s part, the redemption that Jesus earned for us on the Cross. So, redemption was an act of grace and so is justification. Christ’s redeeming act leads to our justification and both are God’s expressions of mercy, and loving kindness, free, undeserved gifts. So, we might say, grace is first a personal characteristic, or even a benignly positive attitude.

But it seems to be even more than that. Yes, in my usage of it in respect of the uncle of my wife, I might say I recognized and wanted to emulate or aspire to this same personal characteristic or benignly positive attitude, but in the New Testament it seems to have more about it. For instance, it seems foundational to who we are in the body of Christ: “We have different gifts, according to the grace given us.” (Rom 12:6) Grace there, seems more an ability, the ability to exercise a gift, or behave supernaturally.  But then all my previous attempts to tie down this globule of mercury have all also been characteristics or attitudes, that are identified by a behaviour.  Mercy, for instance is an expression or act of God in a particular way.

But then we have to ask, how do we get this grace into us, if I may put it like that? How do I get these abilities we have just referred to? The answer has to be by the indwelling presence of God’s Holy Spirit. It is Him in me that is the resource that enables me to live out my Christian life, my life in relation to the Lord, expressed in everyday behaviour. Later on in these studies we will look at things that are said to be ‘fruit of the Spirit’ (Gal 5:22,23).  Now fruit naturally grows. The only two commands linked to those verses speak of being “led by the Spirit,” (v.18) and “let us keep in step with the Spirit.” (v.25) so we may conclude that when we allow the Spirit to lead us and we seek to keep in step with what HE is doing, then the things in verses 22 and 23 will naturally start developing and appearing in us.

We would probably be remiss if we didn’t mention the apostle Paul’s famous incident when he pleaded with God to help with a particular weakness but the Lord replied, “But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” (2 Cor 12:9). So grace is equated with power – God’s power, the power released by the Holy Spirit within us. So when we need wisdom or maybe strength, or perhaps patience, all of these are expression of grace that the Spirit provides.

So to summarise: grace is a characteristic AND a resource that is seen when expressed through Christ-like acts. In a variety of ways my wife’s uncle expressed Christ. It will be developed more and more in me as I seek to be obedient to God’s word and His Holy Spirit’s prompting. Yes, as the apostle Paul says in both Ephesians and Colossians, I have a part to play by putting to death the characteristics of the ‘old nature’ and in ‘putting on’ the Christ-characteristics that his Spirit wishes to express in and through us. I still aspire to be the gracious elderly man that I saw in my wife’s uncle. I recognize that the way that grace is shown in me, will be different from the way it is shown in you when it comes to gifts and service (Rom 12:6) but in terms of character we all have this overall sense of what it means to be Christ-like – full of loving kindness, full of mercy, full of good feelings and desires for other people and thankful to God our Father and, yes, summarized as full of grace! Let’s aspire to be like this, more and more.