19. Completion

Meditations in Ruth : 19. Completion

Ruth 4:13   So Boaz took Ruth and she became his wife. Then he went to her, and the LORD enabled her to conceive, and she gave birth to a son.

The story comes to a simple end – the couple get married and live happily ever after. Well that’s how fairy tales end but this isn’t a fairy tale; it is factual history. In our verse above we are given a simple shorthand version of what follows: they are married and Ruth has a son. If that is all we knew it would not be remarkable but when we follow it through we see something so very significant.

The neighbours bless Naomi with a prophetic blessing:The women said to Naomi: “Praise be to the LORD, who this day has not left you without a kinsman-redeemer. May he become famous throughout Israel!” (v.14) Yes, indeed this kinsman-redeemer, Boaz, will become famous in Israel for we have been reading about his graciousness all the while in this book. They continue, “He will renew your life and sustain you in your old age. For your daughter-in-law, who loves you and who is better to you than seven sons, has given him birth.” (v.15) This birth that has ultimately been brought about through the grace and righteousness of all the parties concerned will bless Naomi and bring new joy and meaning to her in her old age. Suddenly she is a grandmother!

The story is brought to a conclusion: “Then Naomi took the child, laid him in her lap and cared for him. The women living there said, “Naomi has a son.” And they named him Obed. He was the father of Jesse, the father of David.” (v.16,17)  The emphasis here is on Naomi for a reason we will consider in a moment. The final significance of all this of all this is noted by the historians in verse 17. This baby will become the grandfather of King David and as such will be part of the Messianic family tree which we find in Matthew: “Salmon the father of Boaz, whose mother was Rahab, Boaz the father of Obed, whose mother was Ruth, Obed the father of Jesse, and Jesse the father of King David.” (Mt 1:5,6)  So what does all this say to us?

First of all, Naomi. Here we have a picture of redemption, of a woman, a wife and a mother who follows her man into a foreign land and loses everything. To all intents and purposes her future is gone but then, by the end of the story, she is a full member of her community, a grandmother with all of the honour that goes with that in that sort of culture and community. She has been gloriously restored.

Next, of course, there is Boaz. What a picture of grace, a good employer, a sensitive, caring and righteous man who is willing to act according to the Law to care even for this foreign woman who has so shown her true colours by returning to Israel with her mother-in-law.

Finally and in many ways, most importantly, Ruth. Of herself she wins our hearts by her touching concern and loyalty for her mother-in-law, willing to leave the familiarity of her own people and her own gods, and go and become part of a totally different culture and follow the One True God. She follows that up with her obedience to her mother-in-law’s suggestions, works hard and does what is considered right in this new culture and takes as a husband an older man, and becomes in every way a member of this community.

But it is not so much her personal attributes that makes Ruth stand out; it is who she is in the divine economy. As we see she becomes a part of the Messianic family tree and, almost in the same breath, with that other foreign woman, Rahab. There, in that male dominated family tree in Matthew’s Gospel, for every male-orientated Jew to see, are two foreign women. When you consider the murky backgrounds of the other two women mentioned in that family tree – Tamar (v.3) and Bathsheba (by implication v.6) we realise there are interesting messages being conveyed by God.

The first message must surely be that although for obvious reasons historically men have been the more dominant, in God’s eyes woman are equally significant.

The second message must be that, because in the case of each of these women their backgrounds  have had serious question marks over them, John shows us through them that God is in the redemption business and that He delights in taking bad situations and bringing good through them.

The third message, in the light of the fact that three of these four women were Gentiles, must be that God looks to draw people from all people groups around the world to Himself.  Indeed with Ruth that must surely be The main message. Again and again we are reminded that she is a Moabite, she is a foreigner – but God is interested in all the world, not just Israel.

The fourth and final message, a more personalised form of the second one, is that background does not debar anyone from the kingdom of God. Past history, past failures, dubious family or whatever, none of these things can keep you from God’s love in God’s kingdom. The Moabites were constantly enemies of Israel and yet this Moabite woman is now in the Messianic family tree.  Knowing that Jesus was conceived of the Holy Spirit and not by Joseph, even more this family tree is there to convey messages from heaven. This is the Lord putting up a banner, if you like, across the book of Ruth that declares boldly, strongly and clearly, “All-comers Welcome!” Hallelujah!

18. Acting Righteously

Meditations in Ruth : 18. Boaz acting righteously

Ruth 4:1   Meanwhile Boaz went up to the town gate and sat there. When the kinsman-redeemer he had mentioned came along, Boaz said, “Come over here, my friend, and sit down.” So he went over and sat down.

We are about to come to verses that are strange to modern eyes but make us realise we are dealing with a very different culture. So often we read of life in Israel in Old and New Testaments and fail to focus our eyes through the culture of the days and places which are so very different from today and here where I live in the West.

Ruth has been told by Naomi to wait. Now it is up to Boaz to check out the situation. He is related and therefore he can be a redeemer-kinsman but there is yet one who is a closer relative, and the closest has to be given first option. It is facing this that shows Boaz to be a righteous man; he is willing to abide by the outcome but it has to be according to the Law. So watch the procedure: Boaz took ten of the elders of the town and said, “Sit here,” and they did so.” (4:2) It is probable that Boaz is well-known and influential and so he calls together leading elders of the town to a public place where they would normally meet. Obviously he also calls the other relative to come: “Then he said to the kinsman-redeemer, “Naomi, who has come back from Moab, is selling the piece of land that belonged to our brother Elimelech. I thought I should bring the matter to your attention and suggest that you buy it in the presence of these seated here and in the presence of the elders of my people. If you will redeem it, do so. But if you will not, tell me, so I will know. For no one has the right to do it except you, and I am next in line.” (4:3,4) Elimelech had some land and, as we saw previously, the Law required that when he died the nearest relative redeemed it. The relative is happy to buy the land: “”I will redeem it,” he said.”

Ah, but there is a problem. If you follow the Law you must also take Ruth as well: “Then Boaz said, “On the day you buy the land from Naomi and from Ruth the Moabitess, you acquire the dead man’s widow, in order to maintain the name of the dead with his property.” (4:5) That is what the Law requires, so of you take the land, you must also take the widow. At this the other balks: “At this, the kinsman-redeemer said, “Then I cannot redeem it because I might endanger my own estate. You redeem it yourself. I cannot do it.” (4:6) It is possible that he fears that, if he has a son by her and that son is his only surviving heir, his own property will transfer to the family of Elimelech. That seems to have been the practice. But if that was his fear, then it must be true of Boaz as well, but he clearly isn’t fearful of his own name, just of caring for Ruth. That is what the rejection by the other relative would have been about, the fear of losing family prestige in the next generation. Boaz is not so concerned.

Then we go through an even stranger cultural practice: “(Now in earlier times in Israel, for the redemption and transfer of property to become final, one party took off his sandal and gave it to the other. This was the method of legalizing transactions in Israel.)” (4:7) It was a simple ritual that signified the passing of property from one person to another and when the elders would have seen it, they would be witnesses to a legal transaction. “So the kinsman-redeemer said to Boaz, “Buy it yourself.” And he removed his sandal. Then Boaz announced to the elders and all the people, “Today you are witnesses that I have bought from Naomi all the property of Elimelech, Kilion and Mahlon. I have also acquired Ruth the Moabitess, Mahlon’s widow, as my wife, in order to maintain the name of the dead with his property, so that his name will not disappear from among his family or from the town records. Today you are witnesses!” (4:8-10) Notice twice, “Today you are witnesses.” It was important for the Law to be followed and seen to be followed and that the transaction had been worked through completely amicably.

Thus we see: “Then the elders and all those at the gate said, “We are witnesses. May the LORD make the woman who is coming into your home like Rachel and Leah, who together built up the house of Israel. May you have standing in Ephrathah and be famous in Bethlehem.” (4:11)  They affirm they are witnesses to this transaction and they acknowledged that in reality Ruth was very much in keeping with what had gone on earlier in history. Rachel and Leah had been the two daughters of Laban who Jacob had married, girls from outside the close family and from another land (although they were distantly related, as intriguingly was Ruth for Moab came from Lot’s family tree originally, nephew of Abraham from whom Israel eventually came). And with this they invoke a blessing upon him as a sign of their approval. It has all been done well!

17. Rest in it

Meditations in Ruth : 17. Rest in it

Ruth 3:18   Then Naomi said, “Wait, my daughter, until you find out what happens. For the man will not rest until the matter is settled today

I have a very strong sense that the message of these verses is for particular people. Let’s note, first of all what happened.  Ruth has returned home after her ‘night out’, (v.15) and Naomi questions her about it and she tells: When Ruth came to her mother-in-law, Naomi asked, “How did it go, my daughter?” Then she told her everything Boaz had done for her and added, “He gave me these six measures of barley, saying, `Don’t go back to your mother-in-law empty-handed.’ “ (v.16,17)  That is the context for what follows, that Boaz has said he will take action and he blesses her with further provision when she leaves.

Now our verse above is very simple but I believe it conveys a simple but important message: “Then Naomi said, “Wait, my daughter, until you find out what happens. For the man will not rest until the matter is settled today.” (v.18)  Indeed it is so simple we might almost despise it for its simplicity. It may be summed up as follows: when you have felt the Lord’s guidance and you have taken a course of action, be at peace, wait and let Him do what He now wants to do in it. If He has shown you further things to do, that is one thing, but otherwise, if you have simply taken the action He led you believe was the right action to take, then rest in it.

It may be that you have been anxious about something in life and you have prayed and prayed, and there seems nothing more to pray. Very well, rest in it that your heavenly Father has heard and knows and will act on your behalf.

It is the heart that is not confident in God that feels it has to keep on doing something, keep on doing further things to bring about what it is sure is right. When we are not sure of God’s love, we feel we have to make the running, someone has to act and if it won’t be Him then it had better be us. We’d never express it as honesty as that, but that is ultimately what we feel deep down.

No, there are times when having done all we can and having committed it all to Him, we need to simply sit back and rest and wait for Him to move. In fact we can confirm out trust in Him by praising Him that He is going to act on our behalf – that is an act of faith. See how it was with David: “Many are asking, “Who can show us any good?” (Psa 3:6a) People about him were questioning their circumstances, so he calls on the Lord: “Let the light of your face shine upon us, O LORD.” (v.6b)  The circumstances have not changed but he is then able to declare, “You have filled my heart with greater joy than when their grain and new wine abound.” (v.7)  As he has prayed he has had that confidence that God will move. The outcome? “I will lie down and sleep in peace, for you alone, O LORD, make me dwell in safety.” (v.8)

Do you remember Paul’s instructions about anxiety and prayer? “Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.” (Phil 4:6) Notice that one word that almost seems out of place – “thanksgiving”. How can you give thanks for the thing that is causing you anxiety? You can’t but you can express your trust in the Lord that He will deal with the cause of your anxiety by thanking Him that He WILL deal with it.

So there it is, learning to rest in the Lord, learning not to keep on and on trying to improve the situation after you have acted according to the guidance. Naomi has given Ruth the guidance. In this Naomi has typified the Holy Spirit. Ruth has followed her instructions and the thing seems to have worked out well – but there is still a glitch to be overcome, the closer redeemer. Yes, OK, he is there and he has rights, but let’s seek to act righteously throughout this, and in so doing , now let’s be at peace and rest in it, waiting to see how it will all work out. Amen? Amen!

16. Playing it Out

Meditations in Ruth : 16. Playing it Out

Ruth 3:5,6   “I will do whatever you say,” Ruth answered. So she went down to the threshing floor and did everything her mother-in-law told her to do.

It is one thing to talk a risky strategy through, it is another to bring it to fruition. With a casual approach we may think this no big thing but in fact it was fraught with possibilities she would not wish to consider. Ruth was, after all, in a foreign land and this course of action could have meant that Boaz took advantage of her and then cast her out, or he could have utterly rejected her, or others could see what was happening and she could get a name for being a whore.

Yet, nevertheless, she says, I will do whatever you say.” (v.5) She trusts Naomi and she trusts the signs of Boaz’s behaviour towards her so far, and “So she went down to the threshing floor and did everything her mother-in-law told her to do.” (v.6) By today’s standards and the behaviour you expect to see on TV and films she is being circumspect to the nth degree, and as anticipated, “When Boaz had finished eating and drinking and was in good spirits, he went over to lie down at the far end of the grain pile.” (v.7a)  So, “Ruth approached quietly, uncovered his feet and lay down.” (v.7b) So far all has gone as planned but this is just the part initiated by Ruth. The important thing is how Boaz will respond.

So the story unfolds: “In the middle of the night something startled the man, and he turned and discovered a woman lying at his feet.” (v.8) It is dark and so he realises it is a woman but he doesn’t know who she is: “Who are you?” he asked.” (v.9a) She replies, “I am your servant Ruth.”  So far so good, but now comes the tricky part: “Spread the corner of your garment over me, since you are a kinsman-redeemer.” How sweet is that? What a gentle was of saying in the way of their culture, “Receive me under your covering and redeem me and make me your wife.” Yes, that is exactly what she means – and he knows it, for that is that the culture was like.

Thus he responds: “The LORD bless you, my daughter. This kindness is greater than that which you showed earlier: You have not run after the younger men, whether rich or poor.” (v.10) i.e. although you could have come to this land and made eyes at young men, you did not. For the sake of your mother-in-law you did not, and now you offer yourself to me, an older man!  Those are noises of appreciation but she needs more than that. She needs more than nice words, she needs actions. She needs to hear from him that he is willing to take those actions.

And she gets the wish: “And now, my daughter, don’t be afraid. I will do for you all you ask. All my fellow townsmen know that you are a woman of noble character.” (v.11) Wow! Yes! How wonderful! He will redeem her and make her his wife. But hold on, there is a problem!  “Although it is true that I am near of kin, there is a kinsman-redeemer nearer than I.” (v.12)  Apparently there is another man who is a closer relative and the law requires the closest relative to take the action, so they will have to act accordingly: “Stay here for the night, and in the morning if he wants to redeem, good; let him redeem. But if he is not willing, as surely as the LORD lives I will do it. Lie here until morning.” (v.13) i.e. OK, stay here until the morning and remain safe (don’t try going home in the dark in the middle of the night; that would not be safe). Then in the morning I will approach this other man and I will see if he wants to redeem you. If he does, I must let him, but if he won’t then I will.

Thus we find, “she lay at his feet until morning, but got up before anyone could be recognized; and he said, “Don’t let it be known that a woman came to the threshing floor.” (v.14) Obviously there were some others of his men sleeping there as well who stirred at daybreak and saw what had happened and were told by the boss, “Tell no one!” But before she leaves, he sends her off with a gift: “He also said, “Bring me the shawl you are wearing and hold it out.” When she did so, he poured into it six measures of barley and put it on her. Then she went back to town.” (v.15) She returns home with hope and further supplies. It has been a good night!

Everything that has happened has been done within the rules of strictest propriety. In it’s simplest sense she has acted out, “I am available. Will you take me as your wife?” and he has responded with gentleness and propriety. There is the matter of the other potential redeemer to be sorted out and he will have to go along with that, but if she is refused he will be honoured to take her as his wife. An amazing example of righteous behaviour from all angles. Will we be as circumspect and righteous in all our dealings in life?

15. A Need Faced

Meditations in Ruth : 15. A Need Faced

Ruth 3:1   One day Naomi her mother-in-law said to her, “My daughter, should I not try to find a home for you, where you will be well provided for?

A little time has passed – but not much as circumstances will show it is still harvest – and wise Naomi faces a problem as she sees it. It is all very well for Ruth to go into the fields gleaning, but harvest will not carry on for ever, and when it comes to an end, Ruth will still be on her own, a widow. Yet she is still young enough to be remarried. In that culture a woman was settled when she was married and so marriage was both expected and desired.

You may find a note in your Bible that an alternative to “find a home” could be “find rest”. Back in the days before they had left Moab, Naomi had said to here two daughter-in-law, May the LORD grant that each of you will find rest in the home of another husband.” (1:9) Marriage was seen as completion for the woman, coming to rest in a role where she could become a mother and where there was no more wondering and speculation about her future. As much as many younger women today espouse a free lifestyle where they have freedom to go from partner to partner, yet hidden in most is that desire to settle with one. The uncertainties of godless, self-centred lifestyles of the twenty-first century in the West make many doubt whether there can ever be a settled permanent relationship, but that was not how it was in Israel. Divorce, although possible according to the Law, was relatively rare.

So Naomi recognizes that getting married would be the ideal for Ruth, but she is a foreigner and not every Israelite man would want a foreign wife as the Law generally did not look in favour on that. Then of course there was the law of the kinsman-redeemer and that, surely, should be the path to tread. But how to bring it about? Boaz has indeed shown kindness and favour to Ruth and he is a kinsman redeemer but would he want to do this? This needs treating carefully and gently. But there is still an opportunity because the harvest is still going on and Ruth can legitimately be in his presence.

Naomi thinks it through and then counsels her daughter-in-law:  “Is not Boaz, with whose servant girls you have been, a kinsman of ours? Tonight he will be winnowing barley on the threshing floor. Wash and perfume yourself, and put on your best clothes. Then go down to the threshing floor, but don’t let him know you are there until he has finished eating and drinking. When he lies down, note the place where he is lying. Then go and uncover his feet and lie down. He will tell you what to do.” What is all this about?

Point One: “Is not Boaz, with whose servant girls you have been, a kinsman of ours?” That is the starting point. If you are to be redeemed according to the laws of our culture, it has to be by one who is in that position – and Boaz is in that position.

Point Two: “Tonight he will be winnowing barley on the threshing floor. i.e. we know where he will be and so all we have to do it arrange for a suitable meeting between the two of you where you can show him your intentions and he can respond accordingly. It’s got to be tonight down at the threshing floor.

Point Three: “Wash and perfume yourself, and put on your best clothes.” When you do meet him you’ve got to be presentable, sufficiently so that he thinks you are good enough to have for a wife.

Point Four: “Then go down to the threshing floor, but don’t let him know you are there until he has finished eating and drinking.” That is a public place and it is improper for you to push yourself on him so keep in the background until all the eating and drinking has been finished and he feels so tired he will sleep down there (which is probably what often happened).

Point Five: “When he lies down, note the place where he is lying. Then go and uncover his feet and lie down. He will tell you what to do.” After he has gone to sleep – and it will probably be in a corner or behind a shelter with some privacy, go and slip under his cover. In this way you will be offering yourself to him but you will be doing it in private and that allows him to make whatever response he wants without pressure. If the thought of redeeming you is not favourable to him, then he will send you home. If, on the other hand, his heart is moved and he wants to redeem you and take you as his wife, he will tell you and will tell you what steps he will take to bring that about.

In what might appear to us as strange behaviour (no asking him outright but acting it out) it allows Boaz to respond as his heart is moved without creating any gossip and he can, if he wishes, back away, and this won’t have caused him embarrassment. It is a strategy of grace and it allows Boaz free choice without embarrassment. It reminds me of young Jonathan’s call to his servant, “Perhaps the LORD will act in our behalf. Nothing can hinder the LORD from saving, whether by many or by few.” (1 Sam 14:6) He was basically saying to his servant, “let’s give this a try. Who knows what the Lord might bring out of it.”  There’s a little of that in Naomi’s strategy: let’s try this approach. It doesn’t bring shame to either you or Boaz but it does let him know what you feel and it does give him opportunity to walk away or redeem you as his wife, and that out of the public gaze. As we said, it is a strategy of grace.

If we feel we need to move things ahead, do we do it with grace, in ways that don’t put pressure on others, that doesn’t force others to act? Do we seek God for His wisdom to do it in ways that leave doors open for others to act? May it be so.

 

14. Naomi’s Wisdom

Meditations in Ruth : 14. Naomi’s Wisdom

Ruth 2:19   Her mother-in-law asked her, “Where did you glean today? Where did you work? Blessed be the man who took notice of you!” Then Ruth told her mother-in-law about the one at whose place she had been working. “The name of the man I worked with today is Boaz,” she said.

When Ruth arrives home in the late evening with all the grain, it is obvious to Naomi that she has been favoured. One does not normally manage to glean this amount of grain in one day. Something must have happened here, some man must have helped her in some way, hence her questions: “Her mother-in-law asked her, “Where did you glean today? Where did you work? Blessed be the man who took notice of you!” (v.19a) There is clearly a story to be told here and she wants to hear it, so Ruth tells her where she had found herself and who whose field it was: “Then Ruth told her mother-in-law about the one at whose place she had been working. “The name of the man I worked with today is Boaz,” she said.” (v.19b)

The moment Naomi hears the name she marvels at what has happened, who it was that Ruth found as her protector-provider: “The LORD bless him!” Naomi said to her daughter-in-law. “He has not stopped showing his kindness to the living and the dead.” She added, “That man is our close relative; he is one of our kinsman-redeemers.” (v.20) Now we often say when teaching about how to go about Bible Studies that with the Bible it is important to understand the culture and Naomi has just used a phrase that needs explaining: “He is one of our kinsman-redeemers”

In the law of Moses we find, “If brothers are living together and one of them dies without a son, his widow must not marry outside the family. Her husband’s brother shall take her and marry her and fulfill the duty of a brother-in-law to her. The first son she bears shall carry on the name of the dead brother so that his name will not be blotted out from Israel,” (Deut 25:5,6) and we also find, “If one of your countrymen becomes poor and sells some of his property, his nearest relative is to come and redeem what his countryman has sold.” (Lev 25:25) It is from these that we get the concept of the ‘kinsman-redeemer’, and this is going to become very significant in this story. The idea is to provide protection for the family or an individual who finds themselves in a poor situation. It not only involves land (as the second quote shows) but also includes widows (as the first quote shows). We may find this strange in the light of modern culture but the idea was to protect the widow by any unmarried brother of the dead husband offering to marry her. That is what we have here in the background of this story.

So Ruth continues telling Naomi what had happened to her (so far she’s only told that she ended up in the field of Boaz): “Then Ruth the Moabitess said, “He even said to me, `Stay with my workers until they finish harvesting all my grain.’ “ (v.21) Note the story-teller still describes her as “Ruth the Moabitess, almost to emphasize the wonder of what is taking place, this alien being absorbed into Israel.  Naomi is very much aware that as two women on their own they are very vulnerable and especially the younger Ruth when she is out working: “Naomi said to Ruth her daughter-in-law, “It will be good for you, my daughter, to go with his girls, because in someone else’s field you might be harmed.” (v.22)  Naomi realises that Ruth is likely to find special care being in the field of a relative. And thus the result of the story summarized is, “So Ruth stayed close to the servant girls of Boaz to glean until the barley and wheat harvests were finished. And she lived with her mother-in-law.” (v.23)

It is very easy to take for granted the small details of this story and thus fail to realise all the components of it, if you like, that go to bring the end result.  We’ve had Ruth’s desire to care for Naomi and herself by going out gleaning (v.2) and then we had what seems chance (or providence) – “As it turned out,” (v.4), then comes this godly employer (v.4) who it turns out is related to Naomi (v.1), who is obviously mindful of the law of caring for the poor (v.8) and is graciously protective of her (v.9), we have Ruth’s industry, working hard all day (v.7,17) and we have more of Boaz’s care drawing her into the family-workers group and providing for her (v.14-16) and now we have Naomi’s understanding and wisdom confirming Ruth in what she is doing. They may all be small things in themselves but they go to bringing about the end result of this story.

But isn’t that exactly how it is with ordinary, everyday life. Small things happen, so small we don’t even notice them probably, but one thing builds on another and another until a big result occurs. Many years ago I felt a need for a word processor and prayed for one and the money came. I started learning ‘Basic’ language to develop simple teaching programs and one day my older son, who was about 9 or 10, came in and I asked him would he like me to teach him Basic. He said yes and six months later I couldn’t understand the language he used. Years later he did a computing degree and runs his own web-design business. Talking with me he offered me a website and from that came all these studies which go to form a very large website resource. One small thing after another building up. Check out your own life and marvel at such things and thank the Lord for His hidden hand of guidance. 

13. Humility and Grace

Meditations in Ruth : 13. Humility and Grace

Ruth 2:13   “May I continue to find favor in your eyes, my lord,” she said. “You have given me comfort and have spoken kindly to your servant–though I do not have the standing of one of your servant girls.”

It is the characters of the various players in this story which are remarkable and go to make it what it is and bring it to the conclusion that comes. Ruth, we have seen already has been caring (for Naomi) and diligent (as she has worked). Now in her response to Boaz I suggest we see both humility and grace. The description of Boaz as “my Lord,” is a gracious way of an inferior addressing a superior. Ruth knows she is simply a foreigner in a strange land and has no claims on anyone or anything. As she has found herself in the field of Boaz, who turns out to be a close relative, and who responds graciously to her, she realises perhaps that here is a source of provision that needs to be cultivated and thus she simply asks, “May I continue to find favour in your eyes.”  We might put it today, “May you continue to be able to think well of me.”

Relationships rarely happen or come into being instantly, they are built up in stages. Boaz has been the one who has initiated this relationship, simply by being caring and understanding. She acknowledges the goodness of it: You have given me comfort and have spoken kindly to your servant.” A relationship is born and grows through conversation, expressions of care and acknowledgements – and humility. She acknowledges, “I do not have the standing of one of your servant girls.” i.e. I am a nobody, a mere alien in your land and even your servant girls have greater claims in this society than I do.

With the often brash and even coarse relationship building that goes on between couples in our culture, where they so often end up in bed even before finding out anything about one another, this slow and gradual building of this relationship must seem strange, but looking at the end fruits one has to challenge, who got it right?

So far all Boaz has offered was protection and water (v.9) Now he draws her into the family/workers circle: “At mealtime Boaz said to her, “Come over here. Have some bread and dip it in the wine vinegar.” When she sat down with the harvesters, he offered her some roasted grain. She ate all she wanted and had some left over.” (v.14) Bread, vine vinegar, and grain are now offered to her, the provisions for the paid workers. The owner is offering her care and acceptance  and the workers will recognize that. In this Boaz goes a step beyond the basics of what the Law required – just to allow the poor to glean in the wake of the harvesters. No, now he has added to that his own provisions, the same as he gave to his workers.

But then as Ruth gets up to continue working, Boaz has a quiet word with his men: “As she got up to glean, Boaz gave orders to his men, “Even if she gathers among the sheaves, don’t embarrass her. Rather, pull out some stalks for her from the bundles and leave them for her to pick up, and don’t rebuke her.” (v.15,16)  In other words, if in her naivety she doesn’t just glean among the stalks but goes to take grain from the fallen stalks, don’t say anything, let her do it and in fact even pull some more stalks out of the gathered bundles so that she has more from which to collect. This is extending his care and provision just one little step further. This is a man of grace. Not for him keeping to the letter of the Law and not going a step further. No, he sees the need and goes beyond the Law in meeting it.

So Ruth works throughout the day strengthening that opinion in respect of her diligence. She takes the corn head that she has collected and thresh them to knock out the grain and separate it from the husks and she collects it and gathers it to take home to Naomi: “So Ruth gleaned in the field until evening. Then she threshed the barley she had gathered, and it amounted to about an ephah. She carried it back to town, and her mother-in-law saw how much she had gathered.” (v.17,18) There might have been some who just collected the bare essential but Ruth is not like that. She takes the opportunity given to her and works right into the evening and fully prepares the grain so she can take home the finished product. She has worked hard and well. The end product is an unusually large amount for one day’s gleaning. She even brings the left-overs from the meal that she had had courtesy of Boaz: “Ruth also brought out and gave her what she had left over after she had eaten enough.” (v.18b) In every way Ruth is whole-hearted in what she has been doing and her mind is clearly on returning to Naomi in the evening with the provision she has obtained in the day. It has been a good day’s work – helped by the generosity and grace of Boaz.

Ruth stands out here as an example to us of a woman who is full of grace and humility, who is a whole-hearted worker and who is going all out to provide for her aging mother-in-law. We make the comment about Naomi aging because if she wasn’t she might have been out in the field as well, but instead she remains back at home and it is left to Ruth to provide for them both. But what Naomi lacks in physical strength perhaps, she makes up for in wisdom and knowledge of her culture, as we shall see as we progress. In the meantime, am I a diligent worker? Am I someone employers, manager and fellow workers like to have around because they know I will pull my weight?  Is that the sort of Christian I am, or am I someone who dives off the moment we get to the end of the working day, looking to do the bare minimum. Many spoil their testimony in such a way.